Magdalena Fournillier Klasse Hesse
Magdalena Fournillier Klasse Hesse
Magdalena Fournillier Klasse Hesse
Magdalena Fournillier Klasse Hesse
Magdalena Fournillier Klasse Hesse
Magdalena Fournillier Klasse Hesse

Bestia Nudista by Magdalena Fournillier ©2013

For Charles Darwin the bare skin is the most important sexual ornament of the human body. Over generations the whole body surface became sexualised. Even the invention of clothes did not counteract this trend. On the contrary, clothes were used as an additional element of sexual attraction. Parts of the body were veiled but also accentuated at the same time. Bare skin is considered as being stimulating and exciting but public nudity can also produce feelings of shame. Human beings distinguish themselves from other species by toying with their nudity and the particular attraction of hiding and showing parts of the body. Human beings are the professionals amongst the naked. However, apart from the human game of showing and hiding, what will happen if you undress what is not meant to be undressed?  

Nakedness will quickly appear grotesque, deformed and strange. Creatures showing their health and vitality by thick and shiny coats of fur are deprived of their natural protection. If animals lose their fur or feathers this is usually a sign of desease or mental illness and stress, or in some cases a breeding result either in private hobby-breedings or in scientific laboratories for model organisms. As natural a naked human body might appear to us, as unnatural and grotesque the naked skin appears on animals who normally have fur. How does the phenotyp of a squirrel distinguish from that of a rat? Two animals that encounter a very different popularity in our culture. Or the phenotyp of a fox from the phenotyp of a dog? Let us observe the contrast of nature and mutation and ask us how much bare skin is still normal?